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(Source: sillyaxolotls, via peens)

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rate-my-reptile:

growingupgu:

Tiny tongue shots!

One notice, at this young scoop age the forc tonc is not much morph than a Sallad or Appetiser forc! Mabye use that to prod out some hamm for a racker with cheec, bon appypeep! 9.46/10 Agrgentina is in france

(via growingupgu)

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(Source: tonysassy, via buckygreyjoy)

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fuckyeahballpythons:

Super Cypress hatchlings produced by Micheal Freedman of The Florida Reptile Ranch.

The Cypress is an incomplete dominant mutation that appears to be similar, and possibly related, to the recently introduced Bongo from E.B. Noah in Ghana.

(Source: reptileradio.net)

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reptiliaherps:

Why can you never cooperate.

reptiliaherps:

Why can you never cooperate.

(via heckyeahreptiles)

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sofriel:

tickatocka:

a kitten trying super hard to fight a ceramic cat statue

THANK U 4 THIS

(via sclez)

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morelia-viridis:

Cheshire’s color change, 2008 through 2011. She’s still changing a little, but this covers the most dramatic part of the color change. Dates in photo captions.

(via snakeworld)

Link

boazpriestly:

  • Over-explanation. This includes prologues. “Prologues are never needed. You can usually throw them in the garbage. They’re usually put on as a patch.”
  • Too much data. “You’re trying to seduce your reader, not burden them,” Friedman said.
  • Over-writing, or “trying too hard.” “We think the more description we add, the more vivid it will be; but we don’t want to be distracted from the story” we open the book for.
  • Beginning the novel with an interior monologue or reflection. Usually this is written as the thoughts of a character who is sitting alone, musing and thinking back on a story. Just start with the story.
  • Beginning the novel with a flashback. Friedman isn’t entirely anti-flashback, but the novel’s opening page is the wrong place for one.
  • Beginning a novel with the “waking up sequence” of a character waking, getting out of bed, putting on slippers, heading for the kitchen and coffee…a cliche
  • Related cliche: beginning the novel with an alarm clock or a ringing phone
  • Starting out with an “ordinary day’s routine” for the main character
  • Beginning with “crisis moments” that aren’t unique: “When the doctor said ‘malignant,’ my life changed forever…” or “The day my father left us I was seven years old…”
  • Don’t start with a dialogue that doesn’t have any context. Building characterization through dialogue is okay anywhere else but there.
  • Starting with backstory, or “going back, then going forward.”
  • Info dump. More formally called “exposition.”
  • Character dump, which is four or more characters on the first page.

(via writeworld)

Tags: writing